problem-solving-teams

In December 2017 we wrote a blog on what makes good teamwork.  Click here for the full article https://www.level7live.com/7-steps-to-team-work/

 

Since that time the world has changed in ways that we would never have imagined.  Our business offering has changed too in that it is more focused and in line with what we believe people and businesses need to live and work harmoniously and productively.  We have embraced a design thinking approach to all that we do and principles that underpin our work and life are those that very much underpin our approach to coaching and problem-solving.

 

Our ‘7 steps to team work’ provided a snapshot of what effective team work looks like, now we propose an additional dimension to the what, in terms of who makes an effective team?

 

In our design thinking work we know that diverse, multi-functional teams produce richer outputs, however, this diversity can also produce potential conflict.  People with different views of the world will undoubtedly have different ideas and opinions and when discussed and viewed positively can help teams to make significant breakthroughs.

 

In reflecting on team diversity, an interesting perspective to consider is one that discourages us to look at people as a stereotype, especially a generational stereotype.  Social Psychologist, Professor Leah Georges suggests that generations do not actually exist, it’s a construct that enables us to compartmentalise people and allows people to act in ways that are widely promoted and assumed about that group and actually people of different ages are more similar than different in their needs and motivational drives.  https://www.ted.com/talks/leah_georges_how_generational_stereotypes_hold_us_back_at_work

 

So how does this view help us when assembling a team for a design thinking Sprint?  Perhaps we could start by being courageous to view people as unique individuals. Georges talks about a person’s “onlyness” and it would be helpful if we aim to understand them in an empathetic way and the contribution they have to offer, irrespective of their age or whatever stereotype we want to categorise them as.

 

What stories can you share that will highlight and help to breakdown stereotype barriers and encourage more diversity of ideas, behaviour and action in teamwork?

 

Let’s start a conversation.

 

Dr Gill Stevens

Level Seven

info@level7live.com

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